Kettles

Here at Robert Dyas, we love a good cuppa! That's why we have a wide range of kettles for you to choose from - whether you're looking for a cordless kettle or an electric one, you'll find the kettle that best suits your needs. We sell fantastic models from the best brands out there, including Russell Hobbs , Swan and Tower. Pair it with a coffee machine if you're a coffee lover or a toaster if you like to start your mornings with Marmite on toast.

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Kettles FAQs

Why buy a kettle?

Kettles are possibly some of the most important pieces of kitchen electronics kitchen electronics in your house. We all rely so heavily on our kitchen kettle to facilitate catch-ups, morning pick-me-ups, and warm-ups in the winter with a lovely cup of tea or coffee (unless you favour a coffee machine, in which case we’ve got a bountiful range of those too). There’s nothing more quintessentially British than putting the kettle on, which is why Robert Dyas offers so many different makes, brands and colours. From a black kettle to a white kettle, a

Russell Hobbs kettle or a Smeg kettle, we have the right product for you.

We have the classic options like pyramid kettles and larger-capacity models like jug kettles. Feel like you need a little bit more than that? We have glass kettles so you can watch the water within bubble and boil with colour-changing lights for a quick kitchen disco, quiet boil kettles that won’t disturb any light sleepers or television shows, cordless kettles, and fast boil options. Basically, we have everything your kitchen could need for a stylishly made cup of tea. If you’re looking for a matching kitchen set, we of course provide coloured or classic white kettle and toaster sets to keep your kitchen decor cohesive.

How to remove limescale from a kettle

you live in an area with hard water, you’re definitely going to find limescale in your kettle over time. It’s usually harmless, but can affect the energy efficiency of your kettle. To remove limescale, measure out equal parts white vinegar and clean tap water, and then fill your kettle water around three-quarters full with the solution. Turn it on and boil the water, then leave it to cool completely before you rinse out the kettle under your kitchen tap. The water might not run clean the first time, which is fine, simply rinse it repeatedly. For any stubborn limescale clinging on to awkward corners, use your kitchen scrubbing brush. When you’re happy with the results, fill your kettle with clean water, boil it, then empty it. Do this a few times to avoid the lingering taste of vinegar in your beverages, and then you’re done!

This is a lot of work just to descale your kettle though, so why not try one of our handy descaling and limescale remover products?

How does a cordless kettle work?

A cordless kettle still needs to be plugged into a power outlet, but its design is entirely different to traditional kitchen kettles. The power cord plugs into the base with the removable kettle sat atop it. When the kettle is fixed in its base, the circuit is completed and the kettle’s coil will begin heating the water when turned on. When the kettle has finished boiling (or even before then) you can remove the kettle from the base. The actual water reservoir and the kettle itself is cordless, as you can walk around unencumbered by a wire and fill up your friends’ cups of tea without them leaving their seats or transport the kettle to the stove to distribute hot water. The base needs the cord to boil the water, but the kettle itself is cordless.

How does a kettle work?

A kettle has a metal coil in the water reservoir or the base which, when turned on, begins to heat up to boil the water. Through the power of heat conduction (science!) the water is heated up to its boiling point of 100 degrees, after which the kettle switches itself off and back to standby. The pouring lip lets out the steam that is evaporated water, and a lot of kettles are designed to audibly ‘click’ with their switch flicking back up to show you they’re done, unless of course you opt for a quiet boil model.